A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the fantastic street art wall murals that were being painted on various building in Detroit’s Historic Eastern Market. Over 45 Detroit area, out-of-state and international street and graffiti artists were invited to take part in a week-long outdoor street art event entitled: Murals in the Market. The event ran from September 17th through the 25th.

In my previous blog entry, I presented early renderings of six incomplete murals that were being created by some of the many street artists taking part in the event. I recently revisited the market on my bicycle to check out the final, completed pieces, including those that I featured in my last story.  Simply stated, the huge, colorful murals at the market are fantastic!

Below are photos of the series of early works that I featured in my prior blog along with a final picture of each. I’m always amazed at what the talented street artist can do, especially on such a massive scale. Some of the pieces are sized 30’ tall x 60’ wide. When looking at the photos, keep in mind that much of the work was done with nothing more than spray cans. Think about that. It’s pretty incredible!

Nosego and Woes - early stage

Nosego and Woes (artists names) – early stage

Nosego and; Woes - final

Nosego and Woes – final


Fel3000 - early stage

Fel3000 (artist name) – early stage

Fel3000 - Final

Fel3000 – final


Beau Stanton - early stage

Beau Stanton (artist name) – early stage

Beau Stanton - final

Beau Stanton – final


Zak - early stage

Zak (artist name) – early stage

Zak - final

Zak – final


Naturel and Rick Williams - early stage

Naturel and Rick Williams (artists names) – early stage

Naturel and Rick Williams - final

Naturel and Rick Williams – final


Sydney G James - early stage

Sydney G James (artist name) – early stage

Sidney G. James - Final

Sidney G. James – final

It’s worth a trip to the market to view the beautiful murals I’ve posted above along with the other 40 or so that were painted during the week-long event.  You’ll never know what you may find there, including this dazzling beauty found on a wall just off Gratiot Avenue. It’s one of my favorites!

Miss Van - French Artist

Miss Van (artist name)

Reminder – you can click on any image to view them larger.

Over the years, Detroit’s Historic Eastern Market has been a hot spot of colorful wall murals. Much of their visual content builds on the market theme of fruits, vegetables and meats. Others themes have been created by local and international street artists, and they feature a variety of strong graphic elements, dreamy caricatures and cartoonish looking characters. Also found on the walls are murals featuring highly stylized letters and striking abstract designs and illustrations.

Building on the market’s rich heritage of street art, the Eastern Market Corporation (in conjunction with a local art gallery, various sponsors and partners) has created a week-long street art event called Murals in the Market. Over 45 Detroit, out-of-state and international street artists have been invited to paint murals in a range of styles on many of the buildings throughout the market. The event got under way on September 17th and runs through the 25th.

Below are a few early photos I took of some of the incomplete murals while riding throughout the market on my bicycle over the past weekend. Many of the finished wall art pieces will soar 20 to 30 feet, and they’ll be at least that wide. Look for final images of the pieces featured below in an upcoming blog entry.

Nosego Woes_2586

Fel3000 E Mkt_2568

Beau Stanton E Mkt_2572

Outline on white bldg E Mkt_2575

Rick Williams E Mkt_2578

Sydney G Games E Mkt _2579

It was quite interesting to see how the artists worked the walls one small section at a time, and it will be exciting to see how their pieces evolve into the final stage.

Stay tuned!

Odd Little Additions

There are some unique, interesting old apartments and single-family buildings in Detroit built in a variety of styles.  Many are still occupied and well maintained. A few have unusual little additions on the front of them that contain businesses, restaurants or walkways leading to adjoining residential buildings. I don’t know how the concept of adding to the front of buildings evolved, but they are odd-looking.

Det Door Addition_2523

Most of the quirky little additions are constructed of brick. A few are made of wood, and all the ones I’ve seen are attached to places that look to be 75 to 100 years old. Some tap into half of the front of the building, while others look to be attached just enough to allow for a standard doorway between the add-on structure and the home or apartment building. Some of the peculiar additions are painted in bright, eye squinting colors that glow in the sunlight.

Nard's Grill Addition_0864

Grill Addition_2522

However they evolved and whatever the reason for attaching them to the front of residential buildings might be, they sure are odd additions to the once beautiful, old residential homes. So odd in fact, that they destroy the architectural character of the buildings that are hooked to.

2 homes connected E Grand Blvd_2537

Gray Addition_0867

While looking at these places on my bicycle rides, I think the little square editions are some type of offshoot of the late 1800’s, early 1900’s version of a live/work environment.  It wasn’t unusual back then for a store to be built at ground level with an apartment above.

I see the attached additions scattered about the city, mostly along busy streets on the fringe of good, solid neighborhoods. I wonder what it must be like for the people living in the apartment buildings or homes where these unusual additions are found.

As I pointed out in my previous blog entries, there are quite a few vintage advertising signs painted on the sides on some of Detroit’s oldest buildings. Many of the once colorful and interesting signs have faded into the brick walls they have been painted on, leaving nothing more than a ghostly image of their intriguing illustrations and lettering. Some featured pastel colors, and others seemed to have had bold, vivid colors incorporated into their graphics, lettering and logos.

This is probably at least 100 years old. A real work of art

Probably at least 100 years old. A real work of art

While out bicycling in Detroit, I see many of these old ads scattered throughout the city. I’ve seen them on old abandoned restaurants, small machine shops, and older storefronts along the city’s main streets. Many of the 100 year-old brick buildings along the riverfront have ruminants of them, usually near the building’s roof line. The sides of vacant buildings within residential neighborhoods that once housed small mom and pop general stores and other specialty shops also have them.

Former neighborhood stove dealer with ad type barely visible

Former neighborhood stove dealer with ad lettering that is barely visible

Nice variety of letter types

Nice variety of letter types

In earlier blog entries on the faded wall signs in Detroit, I noted that most of the vintage signs I’ve seen are slowly disappearing into the walls they are painted on. The sun has bleached them out, and the wicked weather of winter has stripped them of their once colorful highlights.

Here are a few more photos of the fading signs of Detroit that I’ve spotted on my recent bicycle rides throughout the city.


Calming pastel colors on this old wall ad

Light pastel colors on this old wall ad

Machine shop sigh is slowly fading away

Machine shop sign is slowly fading away

Vintage metal sign probably had neon lighting at one time

Vintage metal sign probably had neon lighting

Below are links to past blog entries on the Fading Wall Signs of Detroit.

Fading Wall Signs

Fading Wall Signs – Part 2

Fading Wall Signs – Part 3

Fading Wall Signs – Part 4

Fading Wall Signs – Part 5

Fading Wall Signs – Part 6

Remember, you can click on any image to view it larger.


A Colorful Garden

The other day I was enjoying a leisurely bicycle ride along West Grand Boulevard in Detroit admiring the big old beautiful brick homes. Many were in immaculate shape, well maintained, and nicely landscaped.  Some of the old places have large, inviting porches on both the ground and second levels where people were out sitting, enjoying the warm sunny day. Other old homes along the Boulevard were a little battered, but their timeless, classic 1920’s architecture was still quite evident.

Pedaling south toward the Detroit River a colorful array of flowers caught my attention to the right. At the corner of Nall Street and the Boulevard was a gorgeously landscaped, colorful front yard garden.  In it were a large variety of flowers and plants in a rainbow of colors that included bright reds, glowing yellows, and deep greens.

The delightful, calm setting reminded me of a Monet painting.

W Grand & Nall_0782

W Grand & Nall_0784

W Grand & Nall_0785

Chene Street Detroit

Chene Street on Detroit’s east side was once one of the main streets for the city’s large Polish population. The mile and a half stretch of the street from the I-94 Expressway to Mack Avenue was one once lined with all types of shops, bakeries, ethnic restaurants, bars and other businesses that were supported by the strong Polish community.

Mixed in along Chene, and lining the streets that run parallel to it, were plenty of large two-family and small single-family wood frame homes that housed the rapidly growing Polish population in the early days of the booming automotive industry. With shifting demographics over the years, the once vibrant neighborhood is now pretty much void of commercial and residential buildings.

About three years ago I did a blog entry on the churches of Chene Street that can be viewed by clicking here. In that story I featured the variety of small churches found along that battered street and the people that they seem to cater to. Since that time, I’ve ridden down that street many times watching it slowly deteriorate. Lately it seems more and more of the older buildings have been stripped and torn down.

Like many old buildings I see on my rides, many of the ones that remain on Chene remind me of those that can be found in ghost towns on the prairies of the American west. The old, gray wooden ones especially remind me of those. The aged 100-year old buildings with their weathered cladding, splitting grain lines and sun soaked, dried out wooden facing, remind me of the tough gnarly skin of a lonely old man who worked all his life in the desert sun.



Looking at the old wooden structures that line that barren stretch on the city’s eastside, I see more than rundown buildings; I see a huge part of Detroit’s history and heritage slowly fading away.



Also found along Chene are some pretty interesting commercial brick buildings. A few look as if they are still in use and some feature really nice art deco design elements such as rounded corners and ornate brick work along the roof lines.




There is still quite a variety of interesting buildings along Chene, and unfortunately, many have been stripped and burnt. However, looking beyond their rough condition, there are some real gems of early 1900’s residential and commercial architecture to be seen. It’s a shame that most will be lost forever.



The Ford Rouge Plant is a huge, historic manufacturing facility just downriver from Detroit.  It was completed in 1928, and at that time it was the world’s largest factory of its type. The complex is about 1-1/2 miles wide by 1 mile long. At its peak, it employed about 100,000 workers.

Built along the Rouge River where it meets the Detroit River, it’s a place where large lake freighters pull in to unload iron ore that is turned into steel used in the manufacturing of automobiles. At one time, the historic complex produced nearly everything needed on site to manufacture automobiles from start to finish. Steel, glass, cast iron engine parts, etc. all came together to feed the assembly lines that workers manned 24 hours a day.

Rouge Entrance _2376

Just outside the plant’s main employee entrance along Miller Road is a small park with a brick wall that features a series of historical markers. The markers offer a brief history of the plant. Accompanying them are historic photos of the mammoth facility that have been engraved on granite. They complement the message found on the markers.

Roge Plant History Wall_2366

The markers and photos vary based on the plant’s place in history, and some feature the Rouge Plant’s role during WW II, which included production of non-automotive vehicle parts for airplanes and boats.  There is also a marker pointing out the important part women played in the overall war effort. The female employees were hired during WW II to work the assembly lines, building components for airplanes and other war related vehicles and parts. That is where the term, “Rosie the Riveter” came from.

Rosie Riviter Plaque_2343

Rosie Rouge Engraving _2344

Also featured on the wall are plaques and photos dedicated to the labor movement and the establishment of the United Auto Workers (UAW) at Ford. In the late 1930s, union organizers tried to set up a union at the Rouge Plant. As they crossed Miller Road using the employee overpass leading to the factory entrance, they were met with Ford security guards, and a conflict erupted. Many workers were brutally beaten on that famous day.

Rosie Rouge Plaque_2346

Rouge Miller rd Engraving_2345

The conflict, known as “The Battle of the Overpass”, eventually led to the establishment of the UAW within the Ford Motor Company.

The overpass is still in use today. Standing just across it in the park is a lifelike cast statue of Henry Ford. He’s facing the bridge as if greeting the workers as they arrive.  Just behind him is the brick wall with its historic plaques. Beyond the wall is the huge Rouge complex with its vast steel and power generating plants that are still in operation today.

Henry Ford at Miller Rd Bridge _2371

Henry Ford at Miller rd Park _2370


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